Definition of a Structural Defect

The definition of a Structural Defect is actual physical damage to the designated load-bearing elements of the home caused by failure of such load-bearing elements which affects their load-bearing function to the extent the home becomes unsafe, unsanitary or otherwise unlivable. A question that commonly follows from homeowners is about the damage to other items that may have been caused of the Structural Defect. Do you know the warranty does address the repair of non-load-bearing portions of the home caused by Structural Defects?

Structural Coverage and “Big Picture” Approach

As it states in the warranty contract, the structural coverage is for catastrophic failure of load-bearing elements. As one can imagine, such failure could also affect many non-load-bearing elements. When it comes to the repair of Structural Defects, Section III. B. of the Warranty states in addition to the repair of damage to designated load-bearing portions, the repair of designated non-load-bearing portions, items or systems damaged by the Structural Defect which make the home unsafe, unsanitary or otherwise unlivable are also covered.

Additionally, and more directly to the homeowner concern mentioned above, the repair and cosmetic correction of original surfaces, coverings and finishes damaged by the Structural Defect would also fall under the scope of the repair. It is important to remember it must be an accepted, qualifying Structural Defect and any subsequent repairs are intended to restore the home to the approximate condition just prior to the Structural Defect, and not necessarily to a like-new condition. Inclusion of possible non-load-bearing elements in the scope of a Structural Defect illustrates 2-10 HBW’s willingness to take a “big picture” approach.