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Indoor-Outdoor Connections for Next-Gen Buyers

Indoor-Outdoor Connections for Next-Gen Buyers

The next generation of home buyers faces an uphill climb toward the American Dream. As such, they have certain expectations for any home they buy. For new-home builders, this is a huge opportunity. With new construction increasing in popularity among potential home buyers, let 2-10 Home Buyers Warranty (2-10 HBW)—the industry’s leading structural warranty administrator—show you some ways to deliver on indoor-outdoor connections for next-gen buyers.

Takeaways

  • Indoor-outdoor connections are important to buyers, especially post-pandemic.
  • There are 3 ways you can show off indoor-outdoor connections.
  • A 2-10 HBW structural warranty can really tie the home together.

1. Light: The ultimate indoor-outdoor connection

Few things are more indicative of a connection to the outdoors than natural light. Increased natural light is both a big draw for next-gen buyers and a mood booster for them. (And happy clients tend to offer bright referrals.)

Offering more windows in your homes is a great way to fulfill buyer demand. You can also consider elements like sliding glass patio doors. However, one of the waves of the future comes in the form of moving glass.

Moving glass can fold, be integrated into the home’s slab, and even open entire corners of a room to the outdoors. These options—which used to be strictly high-end options—are becoming more standardized as buyers clarify their expectations for more indoor-outdoor connections.

2. Ventilation: Cleaner air even if the outdoor air isn’t clean

Next-gen buyer desires for good air quality and atmospheric cleanliness are direct results of the pandemic. (Spending most of your time in stale, indoor air will do that!) There are several ways you can deliver on this want.

The most obvious way is to install high-quality ventilation systems, which may also include air purifiers. Another method, which can also be challenging for builders, is to minimize using materials that contain harmful volatile organic compounds and chemicals like formaldehyde.

To go the extra mile for your buyers, you might consider educating them on ways to improve their indoor air quality. Using air filters with higher MERV ratings is a relatively inexpensive way to do this. This will be especially important in the West and Southwest, where wildfires are becoming more common and can make the outdoor air quality worse than the indoor air quality.

3. Finishes: Natural and rustic are back

Next-gen buyers want to combine the futurism of modern living with the rustic nature of the outdoors.  A profound way to give them both is by using natural finishes. It’s also a less expensive way to fulfill your buyers’ interest in indoor-outdoor connections.

You might start in obvious places: laminate wood flooring or traditional hardwood, use of greens and browns in bathroom areas, and combining increased natural light with space for buyers to grow indoor plants.

Tie everything together with a 2-10 HBW structural warranty

When it comes to giving buyers what they want, a 2-10 HBW structural warranty is a big selling point. According to a co-sponsored survey by 2-10 HBW and the NAHB, 94% of prospective home buyers are more likely to purchase a new home from a builder who offers a structural warranty.

When you cover all your homes with a 2-10 HBW structural warranty, you’re doing even more than providing peace of mind for your buyers. You’re also protecting your profit, promoting your quality, and planning for the future by controlling what’s behind you.

There’s a good reason 1 in 6 new homes in the US is covered by a 2-10 HBW structural warranty: No one does it better. Join the industry leader in protecting the American Dream of home ownership. Enroll all of your homes in 2-10 HBW structural warranty coverage.

Learn how you can protect your business and add valuable selling points to your new builds with a 2-10 HBW structural warranty.

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